Why Would You Ban a Book?

As Banned Books Week continues, it’s given me a chance to think about why you would ban a book.

Reading has multiple purposes and it’s purposes vary between the reader.

For me, reading is about learning and relaxing. Reading gives me pleasure and entertainment. For some it is a chore.

But what makes someone think that a book is outrages?

What makes The Perks of Being a Wallflower bad? What makes Harry Potter bad?

I’ve thought about it a lot over the last week, and I can’t figure it out. A lot of the books that appears on the lists of the most challenged books in the US are ones that I clung to growing up. The topics in The Perks of Being A Wallflower are admittedly heavy, but for some they are necessary. Yes, there is drug use and memories of child molestation, but it is also a book about acceptance, and learning that you don’t need to fit into society.

It’s boggles me how anyone would want to stifle literature in such a way that someone would not be able to access them?

If you have any thoughts on this let me know! I think weeks like this inspire discussion on censorship and the way we handle the content of literature, and something that definitely needs to be discussed.

Banned Books Week!

The 23rd to the 29th of October is Banned Books Week!

This is an important week of the year for literature, as it’s a week that celebrates books that have been challenged, either for their authors or their content.

Banned Books Week is an initiative started by the American Library Association and Amnesty International, and highlights the books challenged or removed from libraries and school libraries. Some of them are pretty absurd. Books challenged for LGBT characters, books banned for their drug use, magic, etc.

Is there a book on the list below that you’ve read and loved, but is challenged?

Take a look here and let me know!