Happy 2 Months!

I missed the first month celebration, but we have officially reached two months!

I hope this has been as exciting an adventure for you guys as it has been for me! It’s certainly been a learning curve, and I’m enjoying writing for the Long Readers Book Club more and more as time goes on.

It’s so nice to be able to talk and share my thoughts on books with people, and get involved with reading with people.

I hope everyone continues to have fun!

 

Reading Teen Fiction

Over the years, I’ve read quite a lot of teen fiction, or young adult fiction and immensely enjoyed it. There are so many gems in the genre, and some amazing writers.

Whilst studying English literature at undergraduate level, I discovered that there was some dissent to even considering teen fiction as literature.

There seems to be a stigma around reading teen fiction, about perhaps the way it is not considered literary enough for it be anything noteworthy. I have personally never understood this concept.

Literary fiction implies that the novel that is published under this name is somehow superior. The Oxford Dictionary describes literary as “Concerning the writing, study, or content of literature, especially of the kind valued for quality of form.” Quality of form implies that it is a well-written piece, or it is valued for it’s form, and it’s use of language, perhaps over the plot of the writing. This could also be seen as marking ‘literary fiction’ as a superior writing genre, as it is ‘quality of form’. It could could also imply that the person writing in this genre is somehow better than someone working in teen fiction, or even children’s fiction.

I’m curious as to why that is. Is there a certain aspect of teen fiction that doesn’t meet a certain criteria? Is there an element of classism that makes it not literary?

Classism wouldn’t be hard to rule out, if it is viewed as not literary, then that implies a substandard. That only ‘real’ readers will reader literary works, and that the ease of access of teen fiction or the aim at younger reading implies that there can not be a literary concept to teen fiction. The ease of access implies that anyone can read it, whereas if it were considered literary, it could imply that it is inaccessible to ‘normal’ readers.

What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments!

Your Top 5 Book Recommendations!

We all have our favourite books, but what are your top 5 reading?

What are the top five books you can think of that you always go back to reading?

Mine would be:

  1. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (technically it’s one book!)
  2. After Dark by Haruki Murakami
  3. More Than This by Patrick Ness
  4. Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
  5. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

All five of these books have influenced me in quite a large way, either growing up or as a person. I always struggle to think of my top five favourite books as they change quite frequently. For example, if you’d asked me maybe ten years ago, Harry Potter would have been on that list, too. And whilst Harry Potter was still an influence part of my reading, it’s not in my top five anymore. Maybe in ten years, my top 5 will have changed again.

What are your top 5 favourite books? Let me know in the comments!

July Book Suggestions!

What book has been gripping you to read? That dark mysterious thriller? That historical autobiography? A superhero story? Romance?

July suggestions is officially open!

Write your suggestion in the comments, and the first five (providing we receive five!) will be placed to a poll for everyone to decide!

Happy reading everyone!

What Do You Think Makes A Successful Novel?

What do you think makes a successful novel?

What does a successful novel mean to you? Is it how well it does sales wise, or is a successful novel because you enjoy it?

There are two ways to look at success in a novel, and for me they are both just as important as the other.

Sometimes successful novels that sell well are not always successful novels in other ways. For example, there’s sometimes always the negative connotation that successful popular literature is not successful in the writing department. This is not always necessarily true, but for some, it is not a successful novel to them.

In another sense, a successful novel might not be as popular as some, but is successful in drawing in a reader and is written successfully.

Success within writing is always a matter of personal opinion, and how you understand an authors writing. It’s how you relate to the way the author writes. For example, I personally, really enjoy Patrick Ness’ Chaos Walking trilogy, but when I’ve recommended it to people, they have not enjoyed it as much as I have due to the writing style of the book. For me, the novel was a success, for others, they might not agree.

What is your interpretation of success? How do you value a successful novel?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!