[Book Review] The Binding by Bridget Collins

the binding

The Binding is a haunting story about young Emmett Farmer who is chosen to learn the craft of book binding. Except in this world, book binding is not what we know, and is a kind of magic that takes people’s memories and stores them in a book.

Bridget Collins writes eloquently, and draws the reader in from the first moment. Emmett’s sickness, being chosen, De Havilland. Darney. So much is mentioned and written about, yet leaves the reader waiting for more.

Personally, I was hooked and found it hard to put down. I’m finding it hard to describe the feeling of finishing the book, because I was desperate for the story to never end. I wanted to know more about Emmett, about Lucian Darney and everything that would come to pass.

One thing I wished Collins had delved into more was the Crusades, and have found myself wishing for perhaps a prequel where we perhaps get to see Seredith during the Crusades.

Overall, I loved The Binding, it was what I’d hoped it would be and so much more. The book has much to offer and Bridget Collins does not let the reader down. It is a book I would definitely recommend and hope to see grow further.

[Announcement]

Hello!

So, it’s almost coming up to a year since I started this site, and it’s almost time for my plan to renew the domain so I can keep this blog as it is.

Which has led me to make some important decisions in regards to this blog.

As much as I love writing my reviews and running the book club, my love does not extend to the cost of keeping this blog without the .wordpress.com ending.

So, today, I will be cancelling my plan and just leaving this as a free site.

Despite this now being turned into a free site (I wasn’t making money on here, anyway, I made a whole $0.01 last year, which isn’t enough to cover the £80 odd quid of keeping the site), I will continue to post book reviews.

The bookclub element of this blog is still under consideration. I might just keep this as a place to put reviews and potential discussions, but I do also enjoy running the bookclub as a thing for myself.

So, we’ll see how that goes. Let me know your thoughts on if you would like the bookclub to continue? Or if you’d rather just get book reviews (thoughts more than reviews, as I don’t think my reviews are particularly detailed enough to really be a review).

Thank you for your understanding!

[Book Review] Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

never let me go

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro is a retelling of Kathy’s life as she discovers friendship and love. Kathy, Tommy and Ruth are Hailsham students, they are taught the importance of poetry and art, playing games and working together. But, they will also one day become donors.

The novel focuses on Kathy remembering the past and her experiences that have led her to where she is now. All the fights, all the laughter and love.

The three main characters were well rounded. Kathy, to me, felt a little apathetic, Tommy was naive. Ruth was manipulative.

Kathy’s apathy went in two ways for me, I felt it was almost like a detachment from the situation. This experience of hers was something she just knew and accepted. The most human emotions I felt from her came at the end, when she broke down after Tommy.

Tommy’s naivety shone throughout, but perhaps he was the one who understood the world the most.

Ruth, for me, was perhaps the most dislikable character of the novel. Something about her just made me dislike her from the offset, and that feeling only grew throughout the novel.

Overall, I felt like I enjoyed the book. It was soft, and despite the alternate history of the novel, it didn’t try to explain the things that had happened, because Kathy had never found the curiosity to question, which in turn made me not question the way things had happened the way they did. But, the novel did leave you questioning humanity and the way we treat those we deem ‘other’, and how we view them as part of society. It was definitely an interesting book to read.

It perhaps wasn’t my favourite book, but definitely one I’d recommend to others.

[Book Club] First Week!

The first week was actually up yesterday, but this week has just passed me by without even realising it.

So, I hope you’ve all had an awesome first week of reading! I’ve started my month on Never Let Me Go and I’m enjoying it, despite having a strong dislike for Ruth…

I hope you’re all enjoying! Let me know what you’re reading and what you think in the comments.

If you would like to find out what we’re reading this month, you can find out here!

[Book Review] Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch

rivers of london

Rivers of London follows Peter Grant, a police officer and apprentice wizard as he tracks down a ghost who compels people to kill.

Rivers of London has been on my ‘to be read’ for quite a long time, so I’d been anticipating reading it for a long time in the back of my head. Theoretically, it is a good book, but for me, it fell a little bit short.

The writing style of the novel is great. It’s not too complex, and is easy to read. I found the characters to be a little two dimensional. The plot of the novel just felt like it happened, and it left me feeling vaguely like I was waiting for something a little more complicated to happen.

Peter Grant was okay,  Nightingale was okay, Lesley was okay. The most interesting characters of the novel were Mama Thames and Father Thames, and I’m sure they probably get explored better in later novels, but I don’t really feel a burning desire to continue the series.

Overall, Rivers of London wasn’t for me. It certainly holds appeal for those of us wanting to explore the magical underground of London, and I commend Aaronovitch’s end goal, he’s clearly writing with a series in mind. Unfortunately, the series wasn’t for me.

I’m not one for bad reviews, and this book certainly wasn’t bad, it was good in it’s own way. It just wasn’t the book for me.

[Book Club] [Book Review] Milkman by Anna Burns

milkman

Milkman by Anna Burns is a story about gossip and rumours. This is what is is on the surface, but once you dig deeper into the story it is a story about how one young girl copes with stalking, the circulation of gossip and how this affects her, and the change in perception of those around her to what is happening to her.

Personally, I really enjoyed Milkman. There were so many different aspects and layers to the novel that really stuck out to me, and made me want to keep going. The writing is eloquent, and is gritty and to the point. The story jumps back and forth and sometimes rears off into other directions to display the the subconscious and how we might wander off with our thoughts.

One of my favourite aspects of this novel was the fact that there was no names. Everyone was referred to by their status, either in relation to the community or their relation to middle-sister. This was really interesting to me, it displayed the ambiguity to the story, and raised a level of ‘this could be happening to anyone’.

Another aspect of the novel that was really well handled was the disassociation that took place. Middle-sister, as the novel progressed, became more and more ‘blank’ per say, and the writing style depicted this well.

On the cover of my novel, it tells me that the novel is hilarious, and whilst I might not agree with hilarious, the novel does have it’s funny moments. My favourite moments perhaps being the phone call between Ma and third brother-in-law at the start of Chapter 6, where they’re arguing over middle-sister and running. The writing surrounding both characters in most occasions is absurd, and writes to prove the absurdity of the situation, highlighting Anna Burns’ ability to move across writing styles throughout the novel.

Overall, I would definitely recommend Milkman. I found it a really intriguing novel, and there are so many things I could talk about with this novel, but I struggle to find the words for.

What did you think of Milkman? Let me know in the comments!

[Book Club] February Reading!

Hello!

I hope everyone is as excited for February Reading as I am!

January was a long month, in days and in feelings, so let’s make this short month a great one.

The reading choices for the month of February are:

  1. Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
  2. Washington Black by Esi Edugyan
  3. The Binding by Bridget Collins

I hope everyone likes them, and finds one they know they’ll enjoy reading!

Happy reading, everyone!